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Dec. 05, 2018 UPDATE
Ganko Takasegawa Nijoen - がんこ高瀬川 二条苑 -
Traveler Friendly
The menu includes English, Korean, and Chinese. More than anything, the staff is very friendly, so they will kindly answer any questions about the food and how to eat it.
Menu
English, Korean, Chinese
Languages spoken
Basic English
2885 8 7.7 1 reviews
Dec. 05, 2018 UPDATE

Ganko Takasegawa Nijoen

- がんこ高瀬川 二条苑 -
Traveler Friendly
The menu includes English, Korean, and Chinese. More than anything, the staff is very friendly, so they will kindly answer any questions about the food and how to eat it.
Menu
English, Korean, Chinese
Languages spoken
Basic English
2885 8 7.7 1 reviews
Story & Recommendation
Take in the view of the elegant and spacious Japanese garden while enjoying gorgeous high-class kaiseki cuisine
Located a five-minute walk from the Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae Subway Station. Heading north along the Takase River, a fine stone wall will come into view. While you may think it is some kind of a grand estate at first, you will soon catch sight of the restaurant’s entrance gate. This is no estate: it’s the popular kaiseki restaurant Ganko Takasegawa-Nijoen. Ganko Takasegawa-Nijoen was originally the villa of the Edo-period business magnate Suminokura Ryoi and later that of Yamagata Aritomo, the Prime Minister during the Meiji-period. This historic building has occupied the same location for 200 to 300 years. The restaurant has a spacious Japanese garden that hardly anyone would expect to find in the middle of Kyoto. In contrast to the impressive garden, the food is refined and delicate. Evidence of the restaurant’s careful consideration and dedication is everywhere, giving you a sense of Japan’s spirit of hospitality.
1Recommended
Kaiseki course Midori
Kaiseki course Midori / ¥10,000 (+tax)
This Kaiseki course includes 10 items, plus dessert. You can order it for lunch or dinner. (If you arrive and order before 3 PM, it comes with free coffee and a roll cake!) The presentation is playful, with the ingredients in the shapes of butterflies and fish, or an origami crane placed inside an upside-down cup, demonstrating the restaurant’s dedication to making every last detail enjoyable for customers The main attraction of Kaiseki course Midori is the Sashimi. The thinly-sliced sea bream with Ponzu and Momiji-Oroshi (A condiment made from Daikon-Oroshi mixed with chili pepper that is slightly spicy.) is especially delicious, with a combination of spicy heat and Ponzu’s sourness that really brings out the flavor of the sea bream Sashimi.
2Recommended
Lunch Special Kaiseki Nadeshiko
Lunch Special Kaiseki Nadeshiko / ¥3,980 (+tax)
This lunch-only Kaiseki course features 9 items, plus a cake and coffee, and it’s only available from 11:00-3:00. The luxurious multi-course meal includes tempura, salt-roasted sweet fish, sashimi, sushi, and more. It is also relatively inexpensive for a Kaiseki course, letting you enjoy delicious Japanese cuisine to the fullest. I particularly recommend the Tempura, which is popular with overseas visitors. There are lots of different ingredients, including jumbo shrimp and crunchy lotus root, and it goes well with the dashi broth-flavored Tentsuyu.
3Let's Try!
Maiko Plan / Any Kaiseki Course + ¥45,000
At Ganko Takasegawa-Nijoen, you can have Maiko join you at a banquet. For example, there is a Maiko Plan where you can take photos and chat with Maiko that works out to ¥2,250 per person, including the cost of food, etc., for a group of 20 people. Ganko Takasegawa-Nijoen also holds events where you can meet Maiko every month, letting you enjoy the world of Maiko in a relatively casual way.
How to Order



The restaurant receives many overseas visitors, so the menu includes not only English, but also Korean and Chinese. The pages with photos of each Kaiseki course have their own numbers, and the last page gives the details on the dishes and price for each Kaiseki course in English, Korean, and traditional and simplified Chinese.

- Order Tips -
A Kaiseki course is typically eaten with chopsticks, so studying up on how to use chopsticks in advance could help you enjoy your Kaiseki course with more style! The staff is very friendly, so they will kindly answer your questions about dining etiquette and how to eat certain foods. For example, a Kaiseki course is served with a variety of sauces for each of the different items, and since most of the sauces are brown, it can be hard to tell them apart. If that happens to you, just ask the staff.
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