Mar. 19, 2019 UPDATE
Breakfast Kishin Kyoto - 朝食喜心 kyoto -
Traveler Friendly
The menu is in English and the staff can speak a little bit of English.
Menu
English
Languages spoken
English
639 2 7.8 2 reviews
Mar. 19, 2019 UPDATE

Breakfast Kishin Kyoto

- 朝食喜心 kyoto -
Traveler Friendly
The menu is in English and the staff can speak a little bit of English.
Menu
English
Languages spoken
English
639 2 7.8 2 reviews
Story & Recommendation
Enjoy a simple, yet luxurious, breakfast at Breakfast Kishin Kyoto!
Located in the “always-busy-with-tourists” area of Gion, in a quiet alley, Breakfast Kishin Kyoto is a breakfast specialty restaurant that is not only famous among tourists but also the locals. Kishin specializes in “mother’s cooking” like washoku (Japanese cuisine). The specialty of this cuisine is in its warmth; you can taste the passion the chefs have toward the food here. The breakfast at Kishin is made in accordance with the goals of the One Rice One Soup Project. The rice and soup are the “main actors,” and the food is simple, so the ingredients have to be chosen carefully. They chose the rice they use, Tsuyahime from Yamagata Prefecture, after tasting many different rice brands. In the soup called “tonjiru” they use aged pork bought from a local butcher called Kyoto Nakasei and in their miso soup, they use white miso made by Kyoto Shimamura. The dishes are also served on plates chosen by the owner of a pottery shop in Kamakura, Shoken Tomoo, who makes sure that each of the plates in its simplicity also holds a beauty, and that you can have an enjoyable meal at Kishin. The name Kishin comes from a Zen Buddhist saying “To eat and make food, is all training, and to live, this is worth of enjoyment.” I hope those of our readers who are usually busy in the morning, will the take the time to enjoy a Japanese breakfast at Kishin and start their morning feeling fresh.
1Recommended
Breakfast *In the picture: white miso tonjiru soup
Breakfast *In the picture: white miso tonjiru soup / ¥2,500 (+tax)
In the right-top corner you can see a bowl of yuba (tofu skin) skimmed from hot soymilk, then you have rice boiled in a big earthenware pot, a soup, dried urume-sardines, and tsukemono pickles. You can choose the soup from Shiromiso Pork, Seasonal Vegetable, and Seafood Tomato. (They have a vegetable pot-au-feu for vegetarians.) The yuba and soups are all made with local ingredients, and they are very delicious, but I want to say a bit more about the rice boiled in an earthenware pot. First, they show you “niebana.” This means the state the rice is in when it has sucked up all the water, and when it’s still a little bit al dente, but fresh and sweet. First, you get to try a little bit of niebana. Next, you get to try the steamed rice. It’s soft, and as you chew it, you will gradually notice how sweet it is. It’s so delicious that I would like to go to Kishin again just to have their rice once more. Lastly, you get to enjoy a bit of the rice that is burnt to the earthenware bowl – something very special. The burnt rice is served with just salt, and it’s fragrant and crunchy. One of the most fun points about Kishin is how you get to try rice cooked with different methods, be it niebana, steamed, or burnt. If you want to have something more to eat, you can also order something extra from their a la carte menu.
2Recommended
Brunch *In the picture: Japanese-style seafood tomato soup
Brunch *In the picture: Japanese-style seafood tomato soup / ¥3,500 (+tax)
For brunch, you get yuba, white rice cooked in an earthenware pot, a soup, tsukemono-pickles, main dish, and a sweet. You can choose the main dish from fish and meat options. The meat is fried chicken tenders and the fish is mackerel (subject to change). The sweet is a traditional Japanese one called monaka, which contains red bean paste with just the right amount of sweetness, and as the sweet is shaped like a bottle gourd, it’s also very cute. While the brunch here is very healthy, as its mainly vegetables and fish, it’s also going to leave you feeling very satisfied. Like the breakfast, if you want to have something more to eat, you can also order something extra from their a la carte menu. Served from 12 noon to 3:00 pm (Last orders at 1:30 pm).
3Let's Try!
Matcha
Matcha / ¥650 (+tax)
This is recommended for those thinking goes like “I’m in Kyoto! I need to drink matcha!” Often in Japan matcha is served from a tea bowl, but here it’s served from a chic espresso cup. They take their matcha very seriously, and use matcha from Fukuoka Kyuen in Wazuka, an area famous for making Uji tea in Kyoto. They not only use quality matcha, but the chefs stir the tea right before it’s served, so it’s very delicious. It’s served with a dried sweet by the long-established Kyoto sweets shop Kagizen Yoshifusa, and you’re supposed to eat it before drinking the tea.
How to Order

Kishin menu

The menu is in English so ordering is easy. 

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