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Aug. 18, 2020 UPDATE
Daiyasu Gion - 大安 祇園店 -
Traveler Friendly
Some of the menus, product names, flavors, and storage methods are written in foreign languages. There are always English and Chinese speaking staff working.
Information
English and Chinese
Languages spoken
English and Chinese
136 0 --- 0 reviews
Aug. 18, 2020 UPDATE

Daiyasu Gion

- 大安 祇園店 -
Traveler Friendly
Some of the menus, product names, flavors, and storage methods are written in foreign languages. There are always English and Chinese speaking staff working.
Information
English and Chinese
Languages spoken
English and Chinese
136 0 --- 0 reviews
Story & Recommendation
Daiyasu, the Tsukemono store additive-free for over 110 years
Selling Tsukemono (Japanese pickles), Daiyasu Gion first opened its doors on the souvenir laden street between the Gion Shijo station and the Yasaka shrine in 1902. Over those 110 years of business, Daiyasu have proudly set themselves apart with their use of purely home-grown ingredients in what they call “All made in Japan.” The artisans at Daiyasu use a selection of vegetables sourced from farms across the country and pickle them in foodstuff-derived extract and dashi stock. As all of Daiyasu’s products are additive and preservative-free, they are a safe choice as souvenirs for friends and children. In this article, we will showcase a few products which can be stored at room temperature, meaning you don’t have to worry about how long you walk around with them. Even if you’re new to Japanese tsukemono style pickles, we’d love to invite you to challenge yourself and give them a try, as they are almost entirely different from the western pickles you’re likely used to. We also recommend you try these Japanese style pickles with the sake that sold at Daiyasu. A few products do change seasonally; however, over 100 different varieties of Japanese pickles color the shelves at any one time. You can taste test most things, so definitely challenge yourself and give any vegetables you’ve never seen/never tasted a try and see if you can find a new favorite.
1Recommend!
Kogane Takuan
Kogane Takuan / ¥594 (Inc. Tax) / per stick
Kogane Takuan is so much of a tsukemono staple that it has become synonymous with the Japanese pickles. Kogane Takuan is made by pickling the already umami-packed dried Daikon Japanese white radish in a mixture of mirin, sugar, and rice wine. When you bite into the domestically grown daikon, you’ll experience your teeth instantly sinking into the meaty pickle as it begins to split and crunch between your teeth like a bunch of chewy pebbles. The textures here are entirely different from that of normal daikon, so you’d probably never notice that it’s one of those gigantic Japanese white radishes unless you were told. Cut the Kogane Takuan into your desired thickness and get yourself some white rice and miso soup to have a Japanese lunch fit for a king. (We recommend a slice of around 5mm)
2Recommend!
Asa-gobo 90g
Asa-gobo 90g / ¥648 (Inc. Tax)
Asa-gobo – pickled burdock; a favorite at Daiyasu. This Daiyasu original tsukemono pickle brings out the absolute best parts of this long, root-like vegetable, its crunchy texture, and unique aroma. The burdock flavors together with the bonito flake umami filled dashi stock make for an absolutely irresistible pairing. However, these pickles aren’t just delicious, they’re also full of fiber and nutrition too. Daiyasu’s Asa-gobo tsukemono are quite generously flavored, so are a definite recommendation for sake-lovers.
3Check it out!
Amazu-shoga 80g
Amazu-shoga 80g / ¥540 (Inc. Tax)
Out of popular demand from overseas visitors, Daiyasu created their Amazu-shogo – sweet pickled ginger you find alongside sushi (side note, sushi restaurants call it “Gari”). The ginger is sliced into large pieces, each with that classic crunch. As you chew the pickles, you’ll taste the amazing balance of that spicy ginger kick with the syrupy sweetened vinegar. The aftertaste is refreshing and will send a warm shiver through your body. Lovers of spicy food should definitely give this Amazu-shoga pickled ginger a try.
4Check it out!
Cherry Blossom Petals 60g
Cherry Blossom Petals 60g / ¥648 (Inc. Tax)
Pickled in salt and popular as a souvenir; Daiyasu’s Cherry Blossoms Petals are just that. Unlike the pickled vegetables we showcased above, you don’t eat these cherry blossom petals as is, but use them in cooking instead. Some uses include, soaking them in boiling water and making cherry blossom tea, mixing them into pound cake batter and sprinkling them over vanilla ice. For cherry blossom tea, put around two or three petals in the bottom of a cup and pour over boiling water. This will instantly bring out the brilliant aromas of the newly opened petals. These unique pickles give you the chance to enjoy beautiful cherry blossoms regardless of the season with both your eyes and your tongue.
How to buy

1. Daiyasu will be able to offer their Tax Free services if you produce your passport at the register. 

     

2. The free samples placed at the front of the store are limited in number, so depending on the time of day, they might have run out.

- Shopping Tips -

Daiyasu offer a free tea service and rest area, making them a great place to relax after a long day of sightseeing.

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